RUSS

Could Impact Lee County Financially
10:32 am
Fri December 21, 2012

Wapello County Tries to Leave RUSS

It could cost Lee County more money if another county is allowed to leave a regional organization.

Read more
Sewer Study, Vacancy, Anti-Bullying, Retirement
10:44 am
Thu November 29, 2012

Around The Region

LEE COUNTY

An engineering study for a proposed sewer system in rural Lee County could be completed before the end of the year.

The study will provide construction options and potential costs for people living in and around Mooar/Powdertown.

The results of the study will determine whether the sewer project moves forward.

The Lee County Board of Supervisors plans to review it before meeting with residents.

FORT MADISON

Fort Madison Main Street is in the market for a new director.

Read more
iPads, Debris, Sewer, Law Enforcement
10:04 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Around The Region

A quick look at news from around the tri-state region.

Read more
Mooar/Powdertown Potential Site
7:09 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Lee County Signs Sewer Agreement

Lee County has decided to help one of its unincorporated communities with a proposed sewer project.

The Board of Supervisors has entered into a new 28-E agreement with Regional Utility Service Systems (RUSS). 

RUSS is an organization based in Mount Pleasant that helps rural communities secure state and/or federal money for sewer projects.

Supervisor Ernie Schiller says this agreement will allow RUSS to start the preliminary engineering work for a potential sanitary sewer system in the Mooar/Powdertown area north of Keokuk.

Read more
Mental Health Reform
10:49 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Lee County Preparing for Changes

Lee County Board of Supervisors
  • Ryanne Wood on Mental Health

Upcoming changes to Iowa’s mental health system may not impact Lee County in the short term.

The state will start covering the cost of Medicaid-endorsed services in July.  That means there will be no more reimbursements for counties, which will drastically shrink budgets for mental health and other developmental disabilities.

What is left in the budgets will be primarily used to pay for services not covered by Medicaid.

Ryanne Wood oversees Lee County’s MHDD department.  She says that is why efforts are underway to shift county-funded clients to Medicaid.

Read more

Pages