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Election 2012
2:19 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Obama Seeks To Gain Support Among Military Voters

President Obama returns a Marine's salute as he boards the Marine One helicopter Wednesday. Obama traveled to Colorado Springs for the U.S. Air Force Academy graduation ceremony.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 3:38 pm

Historically, the veteran and military vote has gone Republican. In 2008, for example, while losing the presidency, John McCain — a war hero — won 55 percent of this vote.

This year, the Obama campaign thinks it can close the gap.

For one thing, neither candidate is a veteran. And the campaign is hoping to capitalize on a generational change in the military. Four years ago, although he lost the veteran vote overall, President Obama won among vets under age 60.

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Music News
2:18 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Glad To See You Again: Joey Ramone's Unearthed Demos

Joey Ramone: Weightlifter.
Laura Levine

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 1:25 pm

The Ramones were there at the birth of punk rock.

None of the Ramones were actually related, but they all changed their last names to Ramone. They wore matching skinny jeans and leather jackets, and their songs were short and to the point, with hooks that are still impossibly catchy. The band's first album stunned listeners and critics. Joey Ramone described its influence in a 1991 interview in Finland that's posted on YouTube.

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Planet Money
1:47 am
Thu May 24, 2012

Bankrupt In Paradise

A rainbow over the sea in Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands.
Koichi Kamoshida Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 25, 2012 8:05 am

The Northern Mariana Islands are about 4,000 miles west of Hawaii. They look like the kind of tropical islands you see in the movies with bright blue water and white sand beaches.

The people who live on the islands are American. The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands is a U.S. territory. And just like a lot of U.S. states, the commonwealth has a pension plan for its government employees.

Sixto Igisomar used to run it.

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Education
1:44 am
Thu May 24, 2012

National Geography Bee: Test Your World Knowledge

The 10 finalists of the 2012 National Geographic Bee are competing for prizes including a $25,000 scholarship and a trip to the Galapagos Islands.
Rebecca Hale National Geographic

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 11:40 am

The final round of the 2012 National Geographic Bee takes place Thursday, with students between the fourth and eighth grades testing their knowledge of countries, canals and lava lakes. Of the 54 contestants who came to the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C., for the bee, only 10 remain.

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Mongolia Booms
9:47 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia

A baby Bactrian camel is tied up at the edge of the Badam family's small farmstead. Bactrian camels — like all Mongolian mammals — have thick fur to withstand the winters.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 8:57 pm

Mongolia, the land of Genghis Khan and nomadic herders, is in the midst of a remarkable transition. Rich in coal, gold and copper, this country of fewer than 3 million people in Central Asia is riding a mineral boom that is expected to more than double its GDP within a decade. The rapid changes simultaneously excite and unnerve many Mongolians, who hope mining can help pull many out of poverty, but worry it will ravage the environment and further erode the nation's distinctive, nomadic identity.

Last of four parts

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