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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Around the Nation
3:58 am
Tue June 26, 2012

License Plate Readers Spark Privacy Concerns

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Chances are that your car's license plate has been photographed recently and downloaded into a data bank. The leading vendor of automated license plate readers says they're now used in nearly every state. Police say they fight crime, but there are privacy concerns about the new technology, as Charlotte Alright reports from Vermont Public Radio.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR STARTING)

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The Salt
2:35 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Fancy Names Can Fool Wine Geeks Into Paying More For A Bottle

New York Winemaker Christopher Tracy and a bottle of his Blaufrankisch. The wine's difficult to pronounce name may attract oenophiles.
Charles Lane NPR

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:56 pm

Which costs more, a bottle of Fat Bastard or a Tselepou (TSe-le-po)? What about a Cupcake versus some other name that's difficult for Americans to pronounce? Turns out, when it comes to wine, research suggests that the name alone can affect how much consumers are willing to pay for it. But is it that easy to dupe an oenophile?

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Middle East
2:08 am
Tue June 26, 2012

As 'Hungry Season' Nears, Yemenis Struggle For Food

Displaced Yemenis receive food aid from the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in the southern province of Abyan. While food is available in the country, many Yemenis cannot afford to buy it. About 10 million people are going hungry, aid groups say.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 11:32 am

Yemen has long struggled as one of the least developed countries in the world. But now, after a year of protest and unrest that saw the country's longtime dictator step down, the situation for millions of Yemenis is dire.

Aid groups say some 10 million people are now without enough food to eat, and more than 200,000 children face life-threatening levels of malnutrition.

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World
2:07 am
Tue June 26, 2012

As NATO Draws Down, Afghans Fear A Brain Drain

International aid has poured into Afghanistan in recent years, but it is expected to fall sharply as NATO forces pull out. That will place great strains on the economy, and may lead skilled Afghans to leave if they can't find work. Here, street children in Kabul collect food from an aid group.
Dar Yasin AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:37 am

As NATO troops leave Afghanistan, there will also be a decline in aid money that has flooded the country over the past decade and created hundreds of thousands of jobs funded by donor money.

That means fewer jobs for Afghans, and skilled Afghans may be tempted to leave the country as part of a brain drain that could further weaken a fragile state.

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The Salt
2:04 am
Tue June 26, 2012

The Making of Meat-Eating America

Men at a slaughterhouse stand near hanging beef carcasses, late 1940s.
Lass Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:44 am

We eat a lot of meat in this country; per person, more than almost anywhere else on Earth. (Here's a helpful map of global meat-eating.)

But why? What makes an American eat ten or twelve times more meat than the average person in Mozambique or Bangladesh?

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