Morning Edition

Monday- Friday, 4:00- 9:00am
Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep and Tri States Public Radio's Emily Boyer

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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World
2:07 am
Tue June 26, 2012

As NATO Draws Down, Afghans Fear A Brain Drain

International aid has poured into Afghanistan in recent years, but it is expected to fall sharply as NATO forces pull out. That will place great strains on the economy, and may lead skilled Afghans to leave if they can't find work. Here, street children in Kabul collect food from an aid group.
Dar Yasin AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 9:37 am

As NATO troops leave Afghanistan, there will also be a decline in aid money that has flooded the country over the past decade and created hundreds of thousands of jobs funded by donor money.

That means fewer jobs for Afghans, and skilled Afghans may be tempted to leave the country as part of a brain drain that could further weaken a fragile state.

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The Salt
2:04 am
Tue June 26, 2012

The Making of Meat-Eating America

Men at a slaughterhouse stand near hanging beef carcasses, late 1940s.
Lass Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 11:44 am

We eat a lot of meat in this country; per person, more than almost anywhere else on Earth. (Here's a helpful map of global meat-eating.)

But why? What makes an American eat ten or twelve times more meat than the average person in Mozambique or Bangladesh?

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Fine Art
2:02 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Reflective Art Brings Light, Color To Historic Spaces

Andy Cao and Xavier Perrot's Red Bowl installation in Beauvais, France, recalls the way lepers once bathed in animal blood in an effort to cure themselves and avoid being ostracized to the one-time leprosarium where the installation is located.
Courtesy of Cao | Perrot Studio

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 12:03 pm

This is a story about amazing beauty, imagination and magical effects — and it begins, ironically enough, at a one-time leprosarium, or hospital for lepers, in Beauvais, France, a small town outside Paris.

Lepers were sequestered in Beauvais in the 12th century. That history is now noted in an outdoor art installation made up of slim metal rods that curve up into the shape of a bowl. Each rod is tipped with a red, marble-sized glass ball.

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Books
2:01 am
Tue June 26, 2012

Four Books To Help You Master Chicago Politics

Southern Illinois University Press

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 8:08 am

The term "Chicago politics" gets bandied about whenever people complain about what they see as corruption and abuse of power.

Republicans often apply the concept to President Obama, who calls Chicago home. Earlier this year, presidential candidate Mitt Romney called one of the president's appointments "Chicago-style politics at its worst," and Illinois Republican Aaron Schock once described Obama's team as "the Chicago machine apparatus."

But what does that mean? And what are Chicago politics really like?

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The Record
7:06 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Springsteen's American Dream, Beautiful And Bleak

Bruce Springsteen onstage during the Born in the USA tour in 1985.
Richard E. Aaron Redferns

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:39 pm

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