Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Russian TV Host Who Slammed Moscow Says She Won't Go To Crimea

Host Abby Martin of RT America's Breaking the Set.
RT America

The Kremlin-backed Russia Today television channel says a program host who delivered a show-closing commentary denouncing Moscow's intervention in Ukraine will be sent to Crimea to "make up her own mind." But the anchor herself begs to differ.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

WATCH: Drone Catches Video Of Stampeding Dolphins, Whale Calf

Video screen-grab of drone footage of a dolphin stampede off California coast.
Dave Anderson Capt Dave's Dolphin and Whale Safari

Dave Anderson, who runs whale-watching charters out of Dana Point, Calif., used a small camera-equipped drone to capture video of a "mega-pod" of hundreds of common dolphins as well as three gray whale migrating off the coast of San Clemente. In a separate sortie, the drone returned footage of a family of humpback whales off of Maui.

Anderson, who runs Capt Dave's Dolphin and Whale Safari produced the footage into this stunning five-minute video.

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Virus Locked In Siberian Ice For 30,000 Years Is Revived In Lab

This electron microscope image provided by researchers shows a section of a Pithovirus particle, dark outline, inside an infected Acanthamoeba castellanii cell.
Julia Bartoli, Chantal Abergel AP

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 7:27 am

Scientists at a laboratory in France have thawed out and revived an ancient virus found in the Siberian permafrost, making it infectious again for the first time in 30,000 years.

The giant virus known as Pithovirus sibericum was discovered about 100 feet deep in coastal tundra. The pathogen infects tiny amoebas — simple, one-celled organisms.

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The Two-Way
9:55 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Nepal Cracks Down On Messy Everest Climbers

A Nepalese Sherpa collecting garbage, left by climbers, at an altitude of 26,250 feet during a special Everest clean-up expedition.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 11:08 am

As Everest climbing season gets started this week, Nepal is enforcing a rule for scaling the world's tallest mountain that might sound like it came from your mother: Pick up after yourself.

While it's technically not a new rule, it has rarely if ever been enforced.

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Sun March 2, 2014

China Blames Muslim Separatists For Deadly Knife Attack

The scene of a deadly knife attack at the railway station in Kunming in southwest China's Yunnan province on Saturday.
Sui Shui EPA/Landov

This post was updated at 2:10 p.m. ET.

A bizarre mass stabbing at a southern China rail station on Saturday that killed at least 29 people and wounded 143 others is being blamed on Muslim separatists.

As we reported on Saturday, the 10 knife-wielding assailants randomly stabbed people at the Kunming Railway Station in Yunnan province.

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