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It's All Politics
3:31 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Presidential Fundraising Numbers Poised To Skyrocket

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 4:11 pm

The latest financial numbers are coming out Friday from the campaigns of President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney — along with the superPACs that love them.

First, the easy numbers: $53 million was raised in March to re-elect Obama and $12.6 million was raised by the Romney campaign to win the Republican primaries.

But those easy numbers don't give a complete picture.

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'Radio Diaries'
3:28 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

The Artful Reinvention Of Klansman Asa Earl Carter

White Citizens' Council leader Asa Earl Carter denounces school integration in Clinton, Tenn., on Aug. 31, 1956.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:11 pm

In the early 1990s, The Education of Little Tree became a publishing phenomenon. It told the story of an orphan growing up and learning the wisdom of his Native American ancestors, Cherokee Texan author Forrest Carter's purported autobiography.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

To Russia, With Musical Love — After 22 Years' Absence

An advertisement in Moscow for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's first concerts in Russia in more than two decades.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

This week, music is bringing Americans and Russians together in a way that policy discussions never can. And don't call that a cliche in front of the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

If U.S. relations with Russia have hit a sticky patch over Syria and other issues lately, that didn't stop the Chicago Symphony from thrilling a Russian audience this past Wednesday night, just as it did on its last visit — to the then-Soviet Union in 1990.

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Analysis
2:36 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Week In Politics: Election, GSA And Secret Service Scandals

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks of The New York Times.

Asia
2:34 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Slowly, Myanmar Dares To Believe Change Is Real

Girls perform a traditional dance while celebrating Thingyan, Myanmar's new year water festival, in Yangon, on April 15. The new year has brought new hope as the country undergoes rapid political change.
Soe Zeya Tun Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

In Myanmar, there are signs in the most unlikely places that people are starting to believe recent political reforms are for real, and aren't just a trick.

Take a recent performance of the Moustache Brothers vaudeville troupe in the northern city of Mandalay.

The troupe performs in the family home — it's not allowed to perform in public. Its biting political satire, aimed at the generals and their cronies, has made the troupe a favorite of Western tourists and diplomats.

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