News from NPR

Pages

The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Tue June 5, 2012

California's Prop 8 Same-Sex Marriage Ban Looks Headed To Supreme Court

A federal appeals court in San Francisco says it will not reconsider an earlier ruling that California's Prop 8 ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional.

That means, as our colleagues at KQED's News Fix blog report, that "Prop 8 supporters will almost certainly ask the United States Supreme Court to hear the case."

Read more
Around the Nation
12:08 pm
Tue June 5, 2012

Breast-Feeding In Uniform: Brave Or Brazen?

Terran Echegoyen-McCabe and Christina Luna breast-feed their children at Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Wash.
Brynja Sigurdardottir Courtesy Terran Echegoyen-McCabe

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 3:31 pm

A group of Air Force moms photographed breast-feeding their children in uniform and in public have sparked a heated debate among parents and service members. The photos, taken at Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Wash., were intended to be part of a campaign to empower service members to breast-feed.

Terran Echegoyen-McCabe, who was photographed with her 10-month-old twins, told Michel Martin of NPR's Tell Me More that she didn't intend for the photos to be provocative.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Disney To Put Limits On Food Ads In Bid To Nudge Kids To Eat Healthier

Mickey thinks kids should eat better.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

With an endorsement from first lady Michelle Obama for its effort, Walt Disney Co. confirmed this morning that it is going to apply new standards to food ads aimed at children and their families during programming for kids. The entertainment giant says it will try "to inspire kids to lead healthier lifestyles."

Read more
The Two-Way
11:49 am
Tue June 5, 2012

How The Transit Of Venus Helped Unlock The Universe

The planet Venus is seen crossing the sun in June 2004 as photographed through a telescope at Planetarium Urania in Hove, Belgium. The earliest known observation of such a transit was in 1639 by English astronomer Jeremiah Horrocks.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 8:46 am

In an age when the size of the observable universe is known to a few decimal places, today's Transit of Venus offers a good opportunity to reflect on just how far we've come.

(For viewing information, click here.)

Less than 250 years ago, the brightest minds of the Enlightenment were stumped over how far the Earth is from the sun. The transits of the 1760s helped answer that question, providing a virtual yardstick for the universe.

Read more
It's All Politics
11:49 am
Tue June 5, 2012

The Uniqueness Of The 2012 Election

Protesters in Nice, France, hold banners depicting then-French President Nicolas Sarkozy and President Obama before a November 2011 G-20 summit where global financial issues were discussed. Sarkozy has since lost re-election; some political scientists say economic problems in Europe also could play an unprecedented role in the upcoming U.S. election.
Frederic Nebinger Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 2:11 pm

All U.S. presidential elections "are unique in some fashion," says John G. Geer, a political science professor at Vanderbilt University.

Sure, but what about 2012? What exactly will make the 2012 election between President Obama and Mitt Romney truly unique?

Read more

Pages