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10:34 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Coldplay Sharpens Fencer's Game

World class fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad talks about the music that keeps her sharp for competition for Tell Me More's series, "In Your Ear." Muhammad and the rest of the U.S. women's team recently won gold at the Korfanty Sabre World Cup competition.

Barbershop
10:34 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Will Same-Sex Romance Sink R&B's Ocean?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barber Shop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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The Two-Way
10:33 am
Fri July 6, 2012

How Hot Is It? All You Need To See Are These Two Maps

"Papa B" (left) and "Cadillac Bob" find refuge from the heat in a shaded lot between their homes on Chicago's South Side.
Sitthixay Ditthavong AP

Originally published on Fri July 6, 2012 1:11 pm

The heat wave across much of the nation continues.

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Planet Money
9:08 am
Fri July 6, 2012

How Unemployment Has Dragged On, In Three Charts

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Mon July 9, 2012 10:06 pm

Losing your job is rarely good. Not being able to find one for months can be disastrous for individuals, and bad for society as well. Yet during the recent recession and the current anemic recovery, more people in the U.S. have been unemployed for longer than at any time since 1948.

Of all Americans who were unemployed in June, almost half had been without a job for 27 weeks or longer. In other words, 5.4 million people have been jobless for more than half a year.

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The Two-Way
7:17 am
Fri July 6, 2012

Justice For Argentina's 'Stolen Children;' 2 Dictators Convicted

Former dictator and Gen. Jorge Rafael Videla (left), and former general and member of the military junta Reynaldo Bignone in a Buenos Aires court on Thursday.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Nearly four decades later, there's some solace for the families of young women in Argentina who were killed after giving birth under orders from the country's then-dictators. The women's babies — Argentina's "stolen children" — were then handed over to loyal members of the military.

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