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1:06 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Hometowns Help Cheer Olympians To Victory

Sherone Simpson of Jamaica, Lauryn Williams of the U.S. and Veronica Campbell of Jamaica compete in the women's 100 meter final at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympic Games, the race in which Williams won her silver medal.
Andy Lyons Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 2:41 pm

Before the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, U.S. sprinter Lauryn Williams accepted that her father, who was suffering from leukemia, wouldn't be there to see her compete in the 100-meter dash. But when residents of her hometown in Rochester, Pa., heard about it, they raised enough money to send her father and several other family members to Athens.

"I was very surprised," Williams tells NPR's Neal Conan. "It was really a great experience just to see everyone rally together."

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Around the Nation
1:06 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

What Previous Massacres Teach Us About Aurora

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 2:10 pm

Events like the mass shooting that killed 12 people and wounded dozes more in Aurora, Colorado can remind survivors of past massacres about their experiences. Edward Smith, a reporter with the Denver Post at the time of the Columbine shooting, and callers talk about what's been learned.

The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Message To Syria: You Can't Use Chemical Weapons On Foreigners, Either

Headlines today about one of the latest statements from the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad have tended to focus on the news that a spokesman says the government would never use chemical or biological weapons against its own people.

The stories take two angles: One, that this confirms Syria has such weapons; two, that it's good the regime says it won't use them on civilians.

Of course, the regime has also pledged to abide by a ceasefire brokered by former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, and in the ensuing weeks the bloodshed in Syria has continued.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Mon July 23, 2012

Employee Admits To Setting Navy Sub Fire To Get Out Of Work Early

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Miami (SSN 755) enters a dry dock to begin an engineered overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine.
Jim Cleveland U.S. Navy

Originally published on Mon July 23, 2012 12:29 pm

You remember that fire on the Navy submarine that caused $400 million in damage in May? Last month, we told you that a preliminary investigation had found the fire was started by a vacuum cleaner.

Well, it gets weirder.

Today, we learn that a civilian employee has admitted to setting the fire because he wanted to get out of work early.

The Associated Press reports:

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Mon July 23, 2012

In Anaheim, Protests Erupt Over Police Shooting Of Unarmed Man

A police dog attacks protesters.
CBS News

Over the weekend things have been very tense in Anaheim, Calif. For two days, people have protested the shooting death of an unarmed man by a police officer.

As the AP reports, last night protesters set fire to a dumpster after earlier having stormed the police headquarters lobby "as the police chief prepared to hold a news conference to discuss the case."

The AP adds:

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