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Religion
10:31 am
Mon July 30, 2012

An Athlete's Ramadan Dilemma: To Fast or Not?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we check in with former Olympic gold medalist, Dominique Moceanu. She tells us why all that glitters is not gold. She says her journey to Olympic glory shows the ugly side of elite sport. You'll hear her cautionary tale in just a few minutes.

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Health
10:31 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Weight Gain, Health Issues Threaten Muslim Fasters

Muslims across the world are fasting from dawn to dusk for the holy month of Ramadan. Weight gain and health problems related to overeating have been reported during the month, and medical professionals are warning against eating too much to break the fast. Host Michel Martin speaks to dietician Nour Zibdeh about the best ways to eat during Ramadan.

Books
10:31 am
Mon July 30, 2012

For Gymnast Moceanu, Life Threw Her Off Balance

Dominique Moceanu is the youngest gymnast to win an Olympic gold medal; she was 14 during the 1996 Games in Atlanta. Host Michel Martin talks with Moceanu about her new memoir, "Off Balance." The book details the thrill of competition but also a dark side of elite gymnastics.

Music
10:31 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Music Is Motivation For Olympian John Carlos

The image of John Carlos raising a black-gloved fist on the medal stand at the 1968 Olympics became a symbol of the Civil Rights era. Last year, he published "The John Carlos Story," which detailed the trouble he faced after that gesture. Now Carlos tells listeners what music inspires him in Tell Me More's occasional series "In Your Ear."

The Torch
10:28 am
Mon July 30, 2012

Overturned Judo Result Called A 'Farce' And Parody

A judo judge waves a blue flag to award victory to South Korea's Cho Jun-Ho Sunday. But moments later, judges raised white flags instead, giving the win to Masashi Ebinuma of Japan.
Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

Judo is a sport of leverage, strength, tactics and cunning. These attributes can appear to the uninitiated to be two people attempting to grab each other, without success, for five minutes. And then when no points are scored, they try to grab each other for another three minutes of overtime.

One of these gripping contests — the men's quarterfinals at 66 kg — has become the source of international indignation over a perceived injustice. But with the sport of Judo, an apparently firm set of circumstances can flip in an instant.

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