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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Last Words: An Author's Rhymed Farewell

David Rakoff was a radio essayist for public radio's This American Life.
Deirdre Dolan

What a loss. That's the thought that kept running through my head as I flagged one inspired rhyme after another in David Rakoff's risky (though hardly risqué) posthumous first novel. Why risky? For starters, Rakoff, who died of cancer last summer, at 47, chose to write this last book in verse — albeit an accessible, delightful iambic tetrameter that is more akin to Dr. Seuss than T.S. Eliot.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
6:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Lost And Found: 5 Forgotten Classics Worth Revisiting

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:25 pm

I don't remember when I first realized that books could go away, that they could — and did — pass into obscurity or out of print. Myra Breckinridge by Gore Vidal, All About H. Hatterr by G.V. Desani, Speedboat by Renata Adler, the sublime An Armful of Warm Girl by W.M. Spackman. Each of them, snuffed out. It seemed a scandal. But I vividly recall becoming aware that particular books were prone. To take chances with language or form was to court extinction.

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Book Reviews
6:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

For The Love Of The Game: How Cricket Transformed India

Cricket Game
iStockphoto.com

The English language and cricket were Britain's two largest colonial legacies in India, says journalist James Astill, but it is the second of these bequests that is the subject of his important and incisive new book, The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption, And the Turbulent Rise of Modern India. Astill is a former bureau chief for the Economist in New Delhi, and he notes the parallels between the country's control of cricket and its dramatic economic rise.

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The Two-Way
5:48 am
Tue July 16, 2013

In Egypt, More Clashes Leave 7 Dead, Hundreds Injured

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi block the Six October bridge on Tuesday in the center of Cairo.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 9:00 am

After what had been a week of calm, violence returned to the streets of Cairo late Monday into early Tuesday.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports that Egypt's health ministry said seven people were killed and more than 200 were injured as supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi clashed with police. From Cairo, Leila filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Latin America
4:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Vicious Cartel Leader Arrested In Mexico

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 9:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

One of the most brutal and vicious cartel leaders in Mexico has been arrested. Early yesterday morning, Mexican marines, caught the leader of the notorious Zeta gang organization. The country has killed or captured dozens of kingpins in recent years without managing to bring an end to the high murder rates in many areas.

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