News from NPR

Pages

Space
6:10 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Sending Poetry To Mars

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, to a story I'll do entirely in haiku, so bear with me. And just in case you need a primmer: just three lines of verse. Syllables are what counts here - five, seven, then five. For the last few months, scientists have collected haikus meant for Mars. Thousands of poets, pros and amateurs alike, submitted their work. The public then picked their favorite Mars haikus. We are fans of these, by Anonymous.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Reading) Mars, oh. Do forgive. We never meant to obstruct Your view of Venus.

Read more
Food
6:10 am
Sun August 11, 2013

With Ice Cubes, The Larger The Better

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. It is August. Chances are where you are it's hot. So, maybe you want a drink to cool off. Will it be fruity or fizzy, maybe boozy? Whatever it is, Dan Pashman, host of the Sporkful podcast, thinks you may be overlooking one key ingredient: the ice. He joins us now from our New York studios. Hey Dan.

DAN PASHMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, ice. This seems like a fairly forgettable part of a beverage experience. You say, no. Why?

Read more
Science
6:10 am
Sun August 11, 2013

An Engineer Beats The Physics Of Traffic

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Ah, the road trip - one of the great American summer rituals. But sharing this great tradition with other road trippers can also be intensely frustrating. Perhaps you've found yourself wondering why traffic jams take so long to clear up or why they seem to last so much longer than a crash. Well, Bill Beaty is a research engineer at the University of Washington. He has a little advice about that.

Read more
Recipes
6:03 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Chef Knows The Cows That Go Into 'The Truth'

"The Truth" is the signature steak tartare of John J. Jeffries restaurant in Lancaster City, Pa. Served year-round, this summer it's accompanied by mozzarella and heirloom tomatoes.
Marie Cusick NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Lancaster County, Pa., is well known for its pastoral landscape, Amish community, and agricultural heritage. Despite this reputation, few local chefs have embraced the farm-to-table concept until recently.

A restaurant called John J. Jeffries, in Lancaster City, was among the first. Although the menu changes seasonally, customers can order the restaurant's version of steak tartare year-round.

Read more
Television
6:03 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Faux Meth Is Big Business In 'Breaking Bad' Town

Keith West and Andre Harrison created "Bathing Bad" bath salts, lotions and soaps, as well as Los Pollos Hermanos seasonings through their spa products company, Great Face and Body.
Megan Kamerick for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:09 pm

On a hot summer afternoon in Albuquerque, N.M., the setting for the hit TV show Breaking Bad, a trolley that resembles a roving adobe house is packed with tourists.

The series follows Walter White, a chemistry teacher who turns to cooking methamphetamine to provide for his family after he gets cancer. The show, which begins its final season Sunday, has attracted critical acclaim, a slew of awards and rabid fans — some of whom have crammed onto the trolley for a tour of Breaking Bad filming sites.

Read more

Pages