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NPR Story
3:48 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Is Operation Streamline Worth Its Budget Being Tripled?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:58 am

The Senate immigration bill calls for tripling a controversial federal court program called Operation Streamline. The program takes people caught crossing the border illegally, gives them prison sentences, then deports them. It's hugely expensive — but does it work?

NPR Story
3:48 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Calif. Gov. Debates Changing Who's Eligible For Jury Duty

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:58 am

The California legislature passed a bill that would allow lawful permanent residents to sit on juries. Governor Jerry Brown has until Oct. 13 to sign the bill into law. If he does, California will be the first state to allow non-citizens to perform jury duty.

U.S.
2:26 am
Thu September 5, 2013

More Cities Sweeping Homeless Into Less Prominent Areas

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:58 am

In North Carolina, a fight is brewing over the homeless in the capital city of Raleigh. Elected leaders have asked charitable and religious groups to stop their long-standing tradition of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends.

But advocates for the poor say the city is trying to push the homeless out of a neighborhood that business leaders want to spruce up.

'I Will Arrest You'

Almost every day, the Rev. Hugh Hollowell walks through Moore Square, a centuries-old city park in downtown Raleigh.

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Around the Nation
2:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

Goldkamp also keeps an index card file of choice words to integrate into his poem when he has trouble finding the right words.
Erin Williams STL Public Radio

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 7:10 pm

Typically, 21st century writers fall into two technical categories: Mac or PC. But poet Henry Goldkamp would much rather use a typewriter. He's the sole owner of a mobile poetry business, and for the past three years, he's spent his weekends traveling St. Louis, banging out short poems, on the spot, for anyone who stops by his table.

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Author Interviews
2:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

'Winter's Bone' Author Revisits A Tragedy In His Ozarks Hometown

Daniel Woodrell's novel Winter's Bone -- a dark family saga set in the Ozarks — was adapted into a film in 2010. Woodrell returned to his hometown of West Plains, Mo., about 20 years ago and has been writing there ever since.
Alexander Klein AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:42 pm

The Ozarks mountain town of West Plains, Mo., is the kind of town where a person can stand in his front yard and have a comfortable view of his past.

"My mom was actually born about 150 or 200 feet that way, and my grandfather's house is I guess 200 yards that way," says Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter's Bone, and most recently, The Maid's Version.

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