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Deceptive Cadence
4:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New York City's 'People's Opera' May Face Its Final Curtain

Pamela Armstrong (left) as Alice Ford and Heather Johnson as Meg Page in New York City Opera's production of Falstaff. The so called people's opera may have to cancel its upcoming season if fundraising falls short.
Carol Rosegg New York City Opera

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 9:15 pm

There are a lot of operas that end with heroines on their deathbeds, singing one glorious aria before they die. That's what happens at the end of Anna Nicole, the controversial new work that New York City Opera is presenting at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in September. But the company's artistic director and general manager, George Steel, says it could also be City Opera's last gasp.

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Education
4:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

After Newtown Tragedy, Some Schools Are All But Bulletproof

Dara Van Antwerp, an armed school resource officer, will be permanently stationed at Panther Run Elementary School in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Across the country, schools have increased security after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings in Newtown, Conn., last year.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:05 pm

As parents send their kids off to school this fall, many are wondering what's been done since last year to make sure they're safe.

Many schools have embraced new security measures since the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings, from uniformed police on hallway patrol to shatterproof laminated windows.

'How Could This Have Happened?'

Bob Gay of Newtown, Conn., has a tattoo on his arm of his daughter Josephine's footprints as a baby and the number "2560," for the number of days she was alive.

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Environment
4:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Dust Bowl Worries Swirl Up As Shelterbelt Buckles

A Dust Bowl farmer digs out a fence post to keep it from being buried under drifting sand in Cimarron County, Okla., in 1936.
Arthur Rothstein Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:39 pm

In the 1930s, the Dust Bowl ravaged crops and helped plunge the U.S. into an environmental and economic depression. Farmland in parts of Texas, Kansas, Nebraska and the Dakotas disappeared.

After the howling winds passed and the dust settled, federal foresters planted 100 million trees across the Great Plains, forming a giant windbreak — known as a shelterbelt — that stretched from Texas to Canada.

Now, those trees are dying from drought, leaving some to worry whether another Dust Bowl might swirl up again.

An Experiment That Worked

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NPR Story
4:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

NASCAR Nastiness Results In Sport's Biggest Fine Ever

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:05 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally this hour, NASCAR nastiness. This past Saturday, one team appeared to pull out all the stops to rig a big race. One driver spun out his car, and another took an unnecessary pit stop. Both moves helped advance their teammate to the playoffs. NASCAR fined their team - Michael Waltrip Racing - $300,000, and suspended their general manager indefinitely.

Now, this is the biggest fine in NASCAR history, according to Nate Ryan. He's a senior motorsports reporter for USA Today Sports. He joins us from Charlotte, N.C. Hey there, Nate.

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NPR Story
4:18 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New Head Of Olympic Committee Faces A Number Of Challenges

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:05 pm

The International Olympic committee (IOC) has elected a new president, Thomas Bach of Germany. He assumes leadership of an organization that faces criticism over politics, costs and what some view as its insular approach to which sports are offered during the games. The new president succeeds Jacques Rogge, who lead the IOC for 12 years.

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