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The Two-Way
6:21 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Book News: Man Booker Prize To Be Opened To Americans

British authors such as Hilary Mantel will soon have some competition from across the pond, according to organizers of the Man Booker Prize.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 7:11 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Parallels
6:18 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Germany's Refugee Policy Tested By New Arrivals

NPD Party activists hold up German flags in the Hellersdorf-Marzahn district of Berlin last month, as they protest a new home for asylum seekers.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:43 am

As many as 5,000 Syrian refugees are moving to Germany this month after Chancellor Angela Merkel's government agreed to a U.N. request to host them. But they aren't receiving the warmest welcome in a country where a growing number of Germans are unhappy about the steady stream of asylum seekers. Fanning the flames are right wing extremists, who want Germany to close its doors to refugees.

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Business
6:08 am
Mon September 16, 2013

United To Honor Free Tickets Generated During Glitch

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:02 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Mansfield Waits 121 Years For 2nd Night Game

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 6:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

In 1892, Mansfield University held the first night football game. Brand-new electric lights illuminated the field, just not very well. Squinting in the darkness, players tackled their own teammates and even the ref. Mansfield abandoned night games until this past Saturday, then the Pennsylvania school defeated Princeton. The athletic director says the 121-year pause between night games allowed time to work out the bugs.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:50 am
Mon September 16, 2013

More Rain Expected As Helicopters Search For Stranded Flood Victims

Miranda Woodard and Joey Schendel salvage and clean property after days of flooding in Hygiene, Colo. Mountain towns that had been cut off for days by massive flooding slowly reopened Monday, to reveal cabins toppled, homes ripped from their foundations and everything covered in a thick layer of muck.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 5:02 pm

This post was last updated at 6 p.m. ET.

Helicopters were back in the air on Monday over the 15 counties across Colorado's Front Range where historic flooding has killed at least seven people, left hundreds more stranded and unaccounted for, and forced nearly 12,000 to evacuate their homes.

In a news conference, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said 21 helicopters were conducting "search and rescue missions," and other teams were trying to assess the damage to transportation infrastructure.

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